Why the long face? Sadness makes us seem nobler, more elegant, more adult. Which is pretty weird, when you think about it

saudade2

…[s]urely what people want is to be happy. Whole philosophies (I’m looking at you, utilitarianism) rest on the premise that more happiness is always and everywhere a good thing. There is a Global Happiness Index, measuring how happy people are (Denmark tops the league). Bhutan even has a Gross National Happiness Commission, with the power to review government policy decisions and allocate resources…

…It’s good to be happy sometimes, of course. Yet the strange truth is that we don’t wish to be happy all the time. If we did, more of us would be happy – it’s not as if we in the affluent West lack tools or means to gratify ourselves. Sometimes we are sad because we have cause, and sometimes we are sad because – consciously or unconsciously – we want to be. Perhaps there’s a sense in which emotional variety is better than monotony, even if the monotone is a happy one. But there’s more to it than that, I think. We value sadness in ways that make happiness look a bit simple-minded…

See link for entire article:

http://aeon.co/magazine/altered-states/any-fool-can-be-happy-sadness-takes-strengt

 

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1 Comment

Filed under mental health, psychiatry, psychoanalytic articles, psychoanalytic psychotherapy/counseling, psychology, Uncategorized

One response to “Why the long face? Sadness makes us seem nobler, more elegant, more adult. Which is pretty weird, when you think about it

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